Helping You to Find the Best Assisted Living Homes in Burnsville, MN

assisted living consultants matt and kathy johnson
There is no cost to families for Kathy Quinby-Johnson and Matt Johnson's placement services. Kathy and Matt spend much of their time touring and reviewing local living communities – including assisted living, independent living, dementia and memory care, and residential care homes in Burnsville, MN and Minneapolis Metropolitan area. Kathy and Matt then meet one-on-one with families to assess their needs. Kathy and Matt accompany them on tours of pre-approved facilities, assist them with their negotiations and paperwork, and follow up once your loved ones has moved in.

Who's Senior Care Authority?

Senior Care Authority has the expertise to help you identify and access all available options in assisted living and memory care in Burnsville, MN. We offer no-cost services to help you find appropriate senior living when your loved one can no longer care for themselves at home. Our personalized, face-to-face assistance can help relieve some of the stress and overwhelm during this difficult transition - our expertise and compassion will help lighten the load for you and your family.

Serving Burnsville, MN

Facts about Burnsville, MN

Burnsville is a city 15 miles (24 km) south of downtown Minneapolis in Dakota County in the State of Minnesota. The city lies on the south bank of the Minnesota River, upstream from its confluence with the Mississippi River. Burnsville and nearby suburbs form the southern portion of Minneapolis–Saint Paul, the fifteenth largest metropolitan area in the United States, with about 3.6 million residents. According to the 2010 census, the population is 61,481.

Burnsville has many attractions, including its regional mall, Burnsville Center. The city is also a recreational attraction with Alimagnet Dog Park, a section of Murphy-Hanrehan Park Reserve, and 310-foot (94 m) vertical ski peak Buck Hill. Minnesota River wildlife is protected by the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge.

Originally a rural Irish farming community, Burnsville became the tenth largest city in Minnesota in the 2000 Census following the construction of Interstate 35. Currently the ninth largest suburb in the metro area and a bedroom community of both Minneapolis and Saint Paul, the city was fully built by the late 2000s. Burnsville's downtown area is called Heart of the City with urban-style retail and condominiums. The Burnsville Transit Station serves as the hub and headquarters of the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, providing regional bus service to five other suburbs.

The name Burnsville is attributed to an early Irish settler and land owner, William Byrne. His surname was recorded as "Burns" and was never corrected.

History

The Dakota nation ceded land in 1851 and many relocated to Chief Shakopee's village—the current Shakopee-Mdewakanton Indian Reservation in nearby Prior Lake. The first European settlers were Irish, Scottish and Norwegian farmers who came upriver from Saint Paul. One of these Irish settlers was William Byrne, who had immigrated in 1840 from County Kilkenny, Ireland to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. In 1855, he settled at the present day junction of County Road 34 and Judicial Road near the Scott County line, just southeast of old downtown Savage. He subsequently donated land there for a church, school, and a cemetery as well as serving Town Chairman. In 1858, the Dakota County Board authorized Byrnsville Township in the north by the Minnesota River, east by Eagan and Apple Valley, south by Lakeville, and west by Scott County. There is some ambiguity of if the name actually derived from William Byrne since there were people with the surname "Burns" living in the area (a Scottish variant). The Town Clerk recorded variations between "Burns" and "Byrnes" but at the 1960s city incorporation, the "Burnsville" spelling prevailed. The school district was organized during this time as well. Burnsville originally comprised the present-day downtown of Savage (then known as Hamilton) until county border revisions by the legislature. The Irish and Scottish settlers of this time left their names on many area roads and parks and their religion in Presbyterian, Protestant, and Catholic churches.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 60,306 people, 24,283 households, and 15,656 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,421.0 inhabitants per square mile (934.8/km²). There were 25,759 housing units at an average density of 1,034.1 per square mile (399.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 77.5% White, 10.0% African American, 0.4% Native American, 5.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.5% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.9% of the population.

There were 24,283 households of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.5% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.03.

AVERAGE RATING:

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AVERAGE RATING:

out of 25 reviews